The Hitters Power Drive device is very portable. The built in handle makes it easy to carry and transport. The device can be used on a floor, flat ground, any outdoor surface or indoor practice surface. Hitters can practice from the hitting training aid on their own with or without hitting baseballs from their hitting power initiation position. Without having to hit baseballs to practice and receive feedback it allows use in their yard, inside their home, basement and garage. With the unit being very portable measuring 14’inches in circumference” and weighing approximately 19 pounds they can transport from their home to the yard, gym, training rooms / facilities or field.
OBP refers to how frequently a batter reaches base per plate appearance. Times on base include hits, walks and hit-by-pitches, but do not include errors, times reached on a fielder's choice or a dropped third strike. (Separately, sacrifice bunts are removed from the equation entirely, because it is rarely a hitter's decision to sacrifice himself, but rather a manager's choice as part of an in-game strategy.)
Wood is spending his first season in the AL after 7 in the NL (Cubs, Reds). He's also now a reliever so his hitting days are pretty much behind him, nevertheless he was solid at the plate with 9 homers, a triple and 8 doubles across 280 at-bats. And oh by the way, Wood also hit a home run in Game 2 of the Cubs' '16 NLDS series against the Giants after entering the game in relief of starter Kyle Hendricks.
Since the beginning of baseball, one stat has reigned supreme over all others:  the batting average.  Simply put, the best hitters are always considered to be those who possess the highest.  Every year, the best hitter in the game is generally considered to be the person who retained the highest batting average.  This brings about a question:  Is batting average really as important as it is made out to be?  Or is it actually less important than another similar stat, On base percentage?

The Hitters Power Drive teaches proper weight distribution and transfer of weight from the hitters load position with backside hip and leg drive referred to as positive move position. The training aid teaches by multisensory “CLICK” feedback with a combination of auditory sound and kinetic feel. The timing of hearing this “CLICK” trains hitters to initiate power with their back hip, leg and foot with their transfer which creates a power drive moving forward vs. spinning out, leaking, drifting or floating out front and not hearing the click at all or to late after ball contact. The metallic “CLICK” sound of the standing plate striking the ground plate allows this immediate real time feedback.

When a hitter puts the ball in play, the major league average to get a hit is only slightly above .300.  The upper tier of hitters can average around .340, which is how they manage to consistently hit above .300 year in and year out.  What this number means is that a ball hit in fair territory (many swings do not hit the ball fair) has nearly a 70% chance of being an out.  This is where the walk comes into play.  Hitters who are patient enough to work counts and take pitches are much more susceptible to walks than those who chase every first pitch.  The odds of reaching base after taking 4 balls is obviously 100%.  Essentially, hitters must be lucky in order to get a hit, while drawing a walk guarantees them to reach base.  This is why the walk is such a vital part of baseball overlooked by many. 
We’ve looked at the players with the higher batting averages, now let’s look at some of those players with low averages who were cursed at and ignored in fantasy.  We’ll start with last years whipping boy Carlos Santana and his .231 batting average.  We all loved his power and RBI numbers, but he dragged our averages down like the Titanic.  It might surprise you to know that Santana had a .365 OBP thanks in part to his 113 walks.  As a catcher we can tolerate low averages if a player hits for power, but not from someone who plays first (or third).  Using OBP though, Santana’s numbers were equal to Morneau in 3 categories and he had 10 more home runs. 
By the time the ball has traveled a dozen feet from the pitcher's mound, the batter has a good visual fix on it. In a thought process much too quick for deliberation, he has decided whether the pitch is a fastball, curveball, slider, knuckleball, screwball, or whatever -- yet a good deal of data has gone into this instantaneous and non-verbal decision.
Mickey Cochrane is the only catcher and Arky Vaughan is the only shortstop with a career mark of at least .400.[8][9] Of the 43 players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame with a career on-base percentage of .400 or higher, 27 have been elected. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played at least 10 major league seasons, have been either retired for five seasons or deceased for six months, and have not been banned from MLB.[10] These requirements leave 6 living players ineligible who have played in the past 5 seasons; 5 players (Bill Joyce, Ferris Fain, Jake Stenzel, Bill Lange, and George Selkirk) who did not play 10 seasons in MLB; and Shoeless Joe Jackson, who was banned for his role in the Black Sox Scandal.[11]
A few reactions are fast because they skip the brain altogether--the knee-jerk reflex, for example, requiring only a few nerve-cell-to-nerve-cell interconnections, and thus happens in "the blink of an eye." The neural pathway makes a short loop from sensory cells through interneurons to motor nerve cells, which control the appropriate muscle groups. A message is sent to the brain at the same time it is sent to the muscles, so we actually become aware of the knee jerk as it happens.

Every baseball player would love to be able to hit for power, but not every baseball player is a natural like Bryce Harper. There are a lot of things that go into a powerful baseball swing, and no one swing method or form is the right fit for all hitters. However, there are some "Cream and Clear"-free ways that can help all players add power. With the strategy and preparation, you can develop both your mind and body for power hitting as well as improve your form regardless of your preferred stance or swing.
Watching a player in batting practice will tell you whether or not he can square up a baseball. If he is hitting one-hoppers through the infield that land in the dirt to line drives that are short-hopping the wall, he is squaring up the baseball. If he is consistently hitting balls that land within 45 feet of the plate or are high pop flies, his swing plane is not right and he will not be able to hit at a high level.
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