We all know that a .260 batting average is about average while a mark of .200 is quite poor. We know that .300 is a good figure and that .340 will often win the batting title. However, the values of an average, good, or bad OBP are not so ingrained in us. In 2013, the major league OBP was .318. Among players who qualified for the batting title, Detroit's Miguel Cabrera had the highest OBP with a mark of .442. Kansas City's Alcides Escobar posted the lowest figure at .259. Below, I have included a table that shows OBP for various percentiles in 2013. For example, Matt Holliday's OBP of .389 was better than that of 90% of qualified batters in 2013.
Below is an overhead view of a good rotational swing. We have plotted the path of the hands and bat-head. Although the video discusses plate coverage, note that: (1) the bat-head accelerates rearward (back toward the catcher) about 140 degrees before it swings around toward the pitcher (2) the first movement of the hands are more away than toward the pitcher.
"It's all about having a quality at bat," said Garrido, who has won five national titles. "You can't just go up there and start swinging and expect to get hit after hit. You have to be able to separate the pitches you can hit and the pitches you can't hit. And when you find that pitch let the ball location help you decide where you want to hit it. If you can do that you are on your way."
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